Philips Research - Download Pictures

Nanotechnology


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10.5 x 7.5 cm, 300 dpi, 192 KB
Silicon nanowires
Philips has invented a new method to produce silicon nanowires with much greater efficiency. Electrochemical etching of a pre-indented silicon wafer results in the formation of pores. Under the right conditions, silicon nanowires remain at the points where three pores merge. The new technique yields over 4 billion wires in a single etch step. Silicon nanowires could be used in field emission displays or new types of sensing devices.

Photo: Philips
Silicon nanowires

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7.5 x 7.5 cm, 300 dpi, 146 KB
NanoLEDs
Nanowires of indium phosphide (InP) are well suited for miniature light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in the yellow and green colour range. The LED is obtained by introducing a junction between differently doped regions within a wire. NanoLEDs are promising for light-emitting displays, integrated optics for communications purposes or light sources.

Photo: Philips
NanoLEDs

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11 x 7 cm, 300 dpi, 129 KB
Quantum dot composites
Particles of inorganic semiconducting material with nanometer scale dimensions ("quantum dots") exhibit size-dependent electronic and optical properties which are different from those of bulk solids. Philips is investigating quantum dots in composites with polymers to combine the favourable properties of inorganic materials with those of polymers. These materials could be used as light-emitting diodes (LEDs) of which the colour is determined by the size of the quantum dots.

Photo: Philips
Quantum dot composites

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20 x 6.5 cm, 300 dpi, 597 KB
Carbon nanotube field emitters for microscopes
Images taken by a transmission electron microscope (TEM), of an individual carbon nanotube mounted on a tungsten tip. In a), the end of the tungsten tip (dark) and the complete nanotube (light) can be seen. Picture b) shows the apex of the nanotube under larger magnification. The apex has a radius of just 2.7 nanometers.

Photo: Philips
Carbon nanotube field emitters for microscopes

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8 x 8 cm, 300 dpi, 357 KB
Carbon nanotube field emitters for microscopes
An individual carbon nanotube (multiwalled type) molecule is mounted on a tungsten tip and is used as the electron source of a scanning electron microscope. An electron beam drawn from the extremely small apex of the carbon nanotube has a high current and small energy spread, which can be used to increase the resolution of the microscope. The pictures are transmission electron microscope images of the carbon nanotube on the tungsten tip at several magnifications. 

Photo: Philips
Carbon nanotube field emitters for microscopes

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8.5 x 8 cm, 300 dpi, 177 KB
Liquid Crystal Helix structures
By controlling the pitch of helically shaped structures of liquid crystals, light reflection in a controlled wavelength is obtained. This can be used to increase the brightness and power consumption of displays. Philips Research, together with the Eindhoven University of Technology and the University of Alberta, Canada, has developed world-leading technologies to these structures of liquid-crystals with precisely controlled 3-D dimensions.

Photo: Philips
Liquid Crystal Helix structures

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